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Stretch Guide for Office Workers

04/10/2018 by Pivotal Motion
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Suffering from neck pain
Effects of Desk Jobs and Office Work on Health

While it may not be as noticeable, office work is sedentary and can have poor implications for your health and well being. It is no secret that sitting all day has negative effects.

“The issue that we’re really up against is that we’re not made to sit—certainly not for extended periods of time,” says Michael Fredericson, sports medicine physiatrist at Stanford Health Care.

Bad posture, poorly designed office chairs, sitting all day are just some of the many things that can cause lower back and neck pain. Other implications include wrist and eye strain, shoulder pain and tight hips.

What Can I Do About It?

We also know that sedentary lifestyles (i.e. sitting on our buts) are not good for us! So what can we do about it? Fortunately, there are some simple solutions.This includes simple stretches, making changes to your office and desk set up and keeping active lifestyles outside of work.

According to a 2014 study these changes also boost benefits beyond physical including, reducing musculoskeletal and vision problems, as well as employee’s job satisfaction and happiness.

Can Pivotal Motion Help?

At Pivotal Motion, we have specialised physiotherapists that can assist with your needs. Simply reach out to our friendly team on 07 3352 5116 or book online. We also created a free guide with some handy stretches that aim to assist with damage caused by desk and office jobs. You can access it below!

FREE PRINTABLE STRETCH GUIDE: STRETCHES TO HELP UNDO THE DAMAGE FROM A DESK JOB

Your download link will arrive via email just seconds after subscribing above!

 

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